UX Remotely | Mapping & Sketching

UX Remotely

How can we translate design methods like journey mapping, sketching and design studio sessions to distributed team settings? This is the topic of my second roundup of @uxremotely. As these methods are traditionally thought of as face-to-face only activities, it’s interesting to see, that with a little preparation and process, a remote version can be a viable alternative.

User Experience Design With Distributed Teams – Part 1: Ideation & Sketching

UX Remotely

UPDATE: Instead of continuing with part 2, I decided to not label articles “part 1”  again and instead talk about the topic, collect more ways to do ux work remotely on Twitter and write more specific articles on the subject.

Lately, I’ve been working more and more with teams spread across different cities, countries and timezones. Though there are times when it’s difficult not having everyone in the same room (you know the drill), user experience design can work quite well remotely when you give thought to the tools and methods you are using. Starting with ideation and sketching, I will have a closer look at how the different steps of the ux design process are affected by remote work.

Spiekermann on Government Communication and Form Design

Insights

Some interesting thoughts from 7:16 to 9:02 on how governments communicate with their citizens and how designers could fix it.

There is still horrible government communications. If I look at the text forms. They are just as bad as they were forty years ago. And I could make them a hundred times better in two days. But they don’t realize it’s something that people can do. They go to their advertising agencies, and their advertising agencies aren’t interesting in forms. You know, they do big campaigns. And if they came to me, I would do the form, not the campaign. […]


Exploring the Problem Space Through Prototyping

Prototyping

“Let’s start using the terms ‘prototype’ and ‘mockup’ to mean different things. In my opinion, they talk about different ends of the problem.

A mockup shows us a possible solution. It asks the question, “What do you think of this direction for our design?” Whether the mockup is a sketch or a fully-rendered interactive experience, it’s looking at whether the ideas contained would be a good solution.

Prototypes are different from mockups. They don’t focus on the solution, but on understanding the problem. They ask the question, “What happens when we try this?” Maybe we learn it’s the right idea, but more likely we learn something about the problem we didn’t know before.”

Read more on uie.com